chenyanqing:

Be tuff.

ARRRRRGHH! Me and Kendra after 30 mins in the weight room yesterday—not only were we the only girls there, we were told we were the only girls there by a fellow gym-goer. That’s right. You better watch out, these tuff upper arms will destroy your male privilege/sexism/weirdness!
—y

chenyanqing:

Be tuff.

ARRRRRGHH! Me and Kendra after 30 mins in the weight room yesterday—not only were we the only girls there, we were told we were the only girls there by a fellow gym-goer. That’s right. You better watch out, these tuff upper arms will destroy your male privilege/sexism/weirdness!

—y

Fullness: I'm so glad... ›

fulllness:

…that I am finally accepting my body, and recognizing how lucky I am to have a body that works. No, I don’t have a thigh gap, and currently, my stomach is sticking out (thanks to a delicious snack of rye bread and raspberry jam). But I can touch my toes, run for miles, stay in a plank pose for…

Guys, all go read this! It made me so happy for @fullness when I Read it!! YOU sound like a wonderful, happy, healthy person!! :D keep up your journey, @fullness!! 

—ken

Go to link →
I like this! Both the background and the message. It is something I struggle with very often, but seeing things like this makes me happy and remember that I am who I am, and I can only do what I can do—no more, no less!

It was very hard to remember when this teeny tiny middle schooler came on to the elliptical next to me and just beasted through a mile and a half in the time it took me to do 3/4 of a mile, when I had just been feeling good about maintaining a <11 min mile (10.50 to be exact!) Then I thought about how far I’ve come even since the beginning of last semester, and felt better again!

—ken

I like this! Both the background and the message. It is something I struggle with very often, but seeing things like this makes me happy and remember that I am who I am, and I can only do what I can do—no more, no less!

It was very hard to remember when this teeny tiny middle schooler came on to the elliptical next to me and just beasted through a mile and a half in the time it took me to do 3/4 of a mile, when I had just been feeling good about maintaining a <11 min mile (10.50 to be exact!) Then I thought about how far I’ve come even since the beginning of last semester, and felt better again!

—ken

(via lepidopterologie)

/ Posted on Jan 09 2012 at 4:56pm via with 33 notes
#fitspo  #yoga  #namaste 

palmheart:

(top) Tao Porchon-Lynch is a 93-year-old yoga teacher that has been practicing for 70 years and teaching for 45 years. Also a storied ballroom dancer, Tao’s philosophy is a pure motivational mantra: “There is nothing we cannot do if we harness the power within us.” This video of Tao reveals how sweet she is and her outlook on the benefits of yoga.

(bottom left) Bernice Bates was recently featured in the New York Times for being dubbed the world’s oldest yoga teacher by Guinness World Records (she’s certainly not the oldest, but she is the oldest to complete the hefty paperwork required to receive the title). Bernice started practicing yoga 50 years ago and she doesn’t take any medications or have any health problems to report. Check out this video of Bernice teaching in Pinellas Park, Florida.

(bottom right) Adela Choquet is a 96-year-old yoga teacher who offers classes in The Villages, a big retirement community near Ocala in Central Florida. Adela was introduced to yoga at age 55, and though she found yoga challenging at first, she stuck with it. Nearly 40 years later, she’s feeling the benefits of a regular practice and says, “Yoga takes care of everything. Yoga takes care of every muscle of your body.” She even uses yoga to manage arthritic pain, explaining that “With yoga, I control my arthritis which bothers me a little.” Not bad for 96, eh?

more fitspo. i can only help that yoga will help keep me healthy enough to KEEP practicing yoga in my 80s, 90s even!!

—ken


I remember when I was doing RENT and I was too thin, and I was doing that on purpose because I’m dying, I’m a HIV+ drug addict. I remember having to eat raw food and doing all this work to make sure I could stay thin. And I remember everyone asking me when I was doing press for the movie, “What did you do to get so thin? You looked great!” And I’m like, “I looked emaciated.”
It’s a form of violence in the way that we look at women and how we expect them to look and be, for…what’s sake? Not health, not survival, not enjoyment of life, but just so that you can look ‘pretty’.
I’m constantly telling girls all the time, “Everything’s airbrushed, everything’s retouched, to the point of just that it’s never even asked, and none of us look like that.”
—Rosario Dawson

so true about the airbrushing, and yet still so hard to remember every time we pass the magazine racks&#8230;

I remember when I was doing RENT and I was too thin, and I was doing that on purpose because I’m dying, I’m a HIV+ drug addict. I remember having to eat raw food and doing all this work to make sure I could stay thin. And I remember everyone asking me when I was doing press for the movie, “What did you do to get so thin? You looked great!” And I’m like, “I looked emaciated.”

It’s a form of violence in the way that we look at women and how we expect them to look and be, for…what’s sake? Not health, not survival, not enjoyment of life, but just so that you can look ‘pretty’.

I’m constantly telling girls all the time, “Everything’s airbrushed, everything’s retouched, to the point of just that it’s never even asked, and none of us look like that.”

Rosario Dawson

so true about the airbrushing, and yet still so hard to remember every time we pass the magazine racks…

(via adleriarty)

Added…was the association of female sexuality with sexual voracity, weakness, an inability to control one’s physical appetites, one’s hungers, one’s needs. It has been argued that food and eating have replaced sex as our foremost cultural taboo. To some extent I agree with this but would point out that the taboo is not against food, or sex, or flesh, but against a loss of control. Our most hallowed virtue in modern society is self-control, personal “power.”

Puberty is a perverse rite of passage in contemporary culture….You want to scream with horror as visions of cellulite dance in your head. Girls, Becoming Women, being to emulate the older women in their lives. They diet. They borrow their mothers’ vocabulary, expressions, mannerisms. Between poring over the mysteries of long division and playing kickball at recess, they also discuss, in weirdly adult voices, “keeping their weight down,” with that regretful knowing smile. They pinch their bellies, announcing, “I’m not eating lunch today, oh, no, I really shouldn’t.” Becoming a Woman means becoming someone dissociated from, and spiteful toward, her body. Someone who finds herself always wanting.

It is crucial to notice the language we use when we talk about bodies. We speak as if there was one collective perfect body, a singular entity that we’re all after. The trouble is, I think we are after that one body. We grew up with the impression that underneath all this normal flesh, buried deep in the excessive recesses of our healthy bodies, there was a Perfect Body just waiting to break out. It would look exactly like everyone else’s perfect body….Somehow we, in defiance of nature, would have toothpick thighs and burgeoning bosoms, buns of steel and dainty firm delts.

We were…scrutinizing one another’s bodies from the corners of our eyes, in a manner similar to the way women at a gym are wont to do, as they glance from one pair of hips to their own. Finding themselves, always, excessive. Taking more than their fair share of space.

Marya Hornbacher, in Wasted, describing her experience in ED treatment

I fell for the great American dream, female version, hook, line, and sinker. I, as many young women do, honest-to-God believed that once I Just Lost a Few Pounds, suddenly I would be a New You, I would have Ken-doll men chasing my thin legs down with bouquets of flowers on the street, I would become rich and famous and glamorous and lose my freckles and become blond and five foot ten.

Marya Hornbacher, in Wasted

Marya Hornbached wrote Wasted when she was 21, and in 1998 it was shortlisted for the Pulitzer Prize. I highly recommend this book for anyone and everyone, but especially for those of us who struggle with eating disorders and those who have someone dear to them who struggles with eating disorders. My sister gave me this book when she realized what I was doing, and it single-handedly gave me the realization I needed to pull myself out of the deep end.